The contents of an asset catalog

Asset catalogs can start simple and evolve into a rich and valuable source of knowledge for your organization. This page describes the different types of information that can be stored about an asset and the capabilities that each new piece of information enables.

In general, additional information in the catalog aims to provide at least one of the following benefits:


Basic Asset Properties

Basic Asset Properties

Each instance of an asset, no matter what its physical type, is represented by an Asset (or a subtype of this element - see Assets for a list of the supported sub types) in the catalog.

The Asset contains the following properties:

Usage

With the basic asset properties defined, the asset catalog provides a searchable list of the assets of the organization. The content provides in the names, descriptions and additional properties will determine how easy it is to retrieve specific assets.


Asset Connections

Asset Connections

A connection can be attached to the asset. This provides the information necessary to create a connector to the asset.

The connector is a client to both the data and the information about the asset stored in open metadata. Some connectors use the metadata about the asset to control what data can be retrieved from the asset depending on the caller.

Connector to the Asset

The connection object includes a connector type - containing information about the type of connector to create - and an endpoint detailing the network address and access protocol of the physical asset.

There are API options to request that Egeria creates a default connection that matches the specific asset type. In addition there are options to explicitly set up the connection object, or leave the asset with no connection attached.

Usage

The connector that is generated from the connection object enables both tools and applications to use the asset through a governed interface that provides metadata, data and, in some cases, metadata-driven access control.


Asset Schemas

Asset Schemas

A schema describes the individual data fields and operations of the asset. It is organized to reflect the internal organization of the asset and so acts as a guide to the types of content in the asset and how to navigate around it.

Usage

With the schema in place, it is possible to search for assets based on the type of data, or type of operations that the asset supports.


Asset Ownership

Asset Ownership

Asset ownership defines who is responsible for the asset. This covers ensuring the catalog entry is correct, the contents of the asset are complete and correct and controlling access to the asset.

The owner can be defined as a user identity, a personal profile or a team profile. These definitions are managed by the Community Profile OMAS.

Usage

With an owner established, it records who is responsible for the protection and quality of the asset. It is possible to route requests from the consumers of the asset to the owner. An example of this is in managing queries about the content of the asset and requests for access to its contents.


Asset Zone Membership

Asset Zone Membership

Governance Zones allow assets to be grouped according to their usage. It is possible to assign supported zones to Egeria Open Metadata Access Services (OMASs) to limit the scope of assets that are returned from searches.

Usage

Using governance zones allows the organization to scope the assets that are returned to a community of users who are using the asset catalog.

The governance zones can also be used to define the group of assets that an automated process should process.


Asset Location

Asset Location

Egeria supports the definition of a location model that divides both physical and digital space into hierarchies with cross links between the hierarchies. This means it is possible to link the assets to their location(s)

Usage

Attaching assets to location definitions means it is possible to use details of the location as part of the search for assets.

Knowing the asset location, whether it is a physical or digital location can also help with demonstrating that data sovereignty is being respected and the level of risk that is allocated in a location.


Asset External Identifiers

Asset External Identifiers

A specific asset may be represented in different tools using different names. It is possible to add details of these external identifiers to the Asset.

Usage

Knowinthe names of an asset means that the asset catalog can support searches for assets using the name that specific communities of people know.

It also helps automated process that are operating on the physical asset through a tool or API can look up the appropriate identifier for the asset for that tool/API.


Asset Licenses and Certifications

Asset Licenses and Certifications

An asset can have its license and/or certifications attached to it.

The license determines the terms and conditions of use for the asset. This becomes important particularly when assets come from an external organization. Certifications typically relate to a regulation or standard. When the certification is tied to the asset it means that the asset has passed the requirements.

Usage

Attaching licences and certifications to assets raises awareness of the any restrictions on the use of the assets and to what standards they are managed to. If the licenses and certifications are machine readable, automated processes can used them to control the way that they manage the assets.


Asset Classifiers

Asset Classifiers

Classifiers add labels and properties to the asset that identifies them as part of a specific group, or having specific characteristics.

The classifiers can be added to the whole asset or a field or operation in the schema.

The types of classifiers are:

Usage

Classifiers help to make assets more findable. They also identify which assets should be treated to certain types of processing. For example, data fields marked as sensitive could be masked when added to a sandbox.


Asset Feedback

Asset Feedback

Feedback, such as comments, likes, star ratings and reviews can be added to an asset, typically by consumers of the asset to share experiences, expertise and concerns about the asset.

The author of the feedback can choose whether it is public or private feedback. Public feedback is visible by everyone. Private feedback is visible to the author of the feedback and the owner of the asset.

Feedback can only be changed by the author of the feedback. It can be added to an asset through Asset Consumer OMAS, Asset Owner OMAS and Digital Architecture OMAS.

Usage

Feedback helps to share expertise and use the experience of the assets’ consumers to improve the quality of both the asset contents and its description.


Asset Note Logs

Asset Note Logs

Note logs consist of a series of posts (called notes) that are added over time (like a blog). An asset’s note log can be maintained through the Asset Owner OMAS, Digital Architecture OMAS and IT Infrastructure OMAS.

Usage

Note logs can be used by the asset owner or operations team to post status or usage information about the asset to inform individuals who are using the asset of important information.


Asset External Descriptions

Asset External Descriptions

Not everything that is known about an asset is stored in Egeria. There may be documents, web resources, images, videos and audio files that provide more detail. Through Asset Owner OMAS it is possible to add links to external resources and media.

Usage

Using the links to external resources, an individual is able to learn a lot more about the asset they are considering to use to complete their task.


Asset Lineage

Asset Lineage

Lineage describes the origin of the data that is held by the asset. There are different perspectives on what is meant by ‘origin’.

In general an asset is being accessed by processes. They are either adding/updating/deleting data or reading it. So one perspective of lineage is to see the processes that are providing and using the asset.

Data often flows from asset to asset via the processes, as they read data from one asset, do some processing and store the results in a different asset. The end-to-end flow of data is called an information supply chain. Information supply chains can be modeled and linked to the processes through the Digital Architecture OMAS This offers more of an enterprise view of where the data originated from.

The asset itself is hosted by a software capability that is part of a server. Another perspective on the asset’s origin is the server capability that is hosting it.

Software server capabilities can be linked to a solution component by the Digital Architecture OMAS. Solution components are descriptions produced by architects to document the purpose and behavior of a component. These descriptions add business context to the software server capability definitions. They are linked to the software server capability when it is deployed into the IT landscape.

Similarly, the software server capability hosting an asset can be linked to the digital service it is a part of. Digital Services are anchors for information about the digital services (also known as offerings or products) that the organization is operating. This is a business view of the service that the asset is a part of.

Finally, the asset can include identifiers of other metadata elements from the catalog. This includes:

Both organization and business capability information is maintained through the Community Profile OMAS and documented in the asset by the Asset Owner OMAS.

Usage

Lineage information helps consumers (individuals and/or automated processes) make choices about which is the appropriate asset to use for a certain task. It gives a sense of whether the asset contains data from an authoritative source/business capability/organization/process.

Regulations that require specific types of reports often require lineage as well as the report to help the regulators validate that the report is correct.


Related Assets

Related assets returns other assets that are linked together or are part of the same collection.

Collections allow individuals and automated processes to maintain groups of related assets. For example, an individual may maintain a collection of their favorite assets. A project team may maintain a collection of the assets in use by the project. An automated process may use the retention classification to build a collection of assets that need to be archived. These types of collections are maintained through the following Open Metadata Access Services (OMASs):

In addition, there are natural relationships between assets that are created as the asset is cataloged. For example, a file is related to the folder (also known as a directory) it is located in. Both the file and the folder could be assets in the asset catalog and they would be automatically linked together by the Asset Owner OMAS when these assets were created.

Usage

The related assets enables individuals or automated services to locate assets that are related. For example, a process may use the related assets to step through and process the cataloged files in a folder, or the assets in a specific collection.


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License: CC BY 4.0, Copyright Contributors to the ODPi Egeria project.